FEE FISHING AND THE OUTDOOR SCENE   Leave a comment

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To many the idea of fishing a fee pond is like fishing a swimming pool. To them it is not even fishing.  To others fee fishing is a necessary addition to their fishing scene.  Who is correct?

To some a fish raised in a hatchery on a diet of commercial food is no challenge. Still others find it difficult to catch these same fish.

Fee lakes and ponds provide a place for new anglers to learn the skills necessary to take up the sport. Others use such areas to sharpen skills and develop successful patterns.  It also can be a confidence builder to the novice.

Such lakes are popular with residents of larger metropolitan areas who might otherwise not be able to finds a place to fish close to home.

A close cousin of the pay lakes are those stocked by fish and wildlife agencies. These can be in forest preserves, parks, reservoirs and private ponds.  The fish usually come from commercial hatcheries or state owned facilities.  Some come from the same hatcheries that sell to fee ponds.

Regardless of the type of fishery involved, stocked lakes are good locations to involve youngsters. Kids lose interest if they do not catch fish.  Most of these lakes contain species such as trout, catfish and bluegills.  In most states the daily fishing areas do not require a fishing license.

The quality of this fishing experience is dependent upon the management of the water. Some can be more challenging because some areas practice catch and release.  They seem smarter the second time around.

Those who want to learn from the experience of this fishing need to stop and examine the surroundings. Where did the fish come from?  Why was he there?  What bait or lure di he prefer?  What is it about the bottom of the pond, vegetation, structure or water clarity that attracted the fish to this spot?

Establish a pattern you can use again in similar situations. These patterns work well in non-fee lakes as they do in fee lakes.  Fee lakes are often subject to intense fishing pressure.  Fish react differently under such circumstances.  Once one learns what to expect in these conditions it is easy to transfer the skills to other bodies of water.

By downsizing lures one might not catch a lunker but he will catch more fish. The more fish caught the more learning that takes place.

Do not copy the tactics of those around you. Be different.  Experiment and compare your success with theirs. Fish under pressure in one area will sooner or later move.  That move might bring them to your area.  If others are throwing the same lures, then change yours and offer something different.  Just because others are not catching fish does not mean the fish are not present.

Experiment with a variety of colors. Perhaps others are throwing the wrong color for the fish on that particular day.  The more a fish sees a particular color or shape of lure the less likely he is to attack it.  A change in size, color and shape may be just what it takes to make a fish strike.  Practice in heavily fished fee lakes can allow the angler to develop faith in a given theory.

Check out the heavy weed beds and learn how to fish them without always hanging up. On the other side look for areas without a lot of structure and learn to fish it effectively.

Fee lake fishing is not the same as big water angling. Skills developed where you know fish are present not only help to develop those skills but also to promote your faith in your skills.

People in large metropolitan areas cannot always get away to wilderness lakes and rivers. But time spent at a stocked lake is the next best thing.  Success in fishing comes from experience.  Go fishing as often as possible and try new things.

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