DEER DECOY A DOUBLE EDGED SWORD   Leave a comment

White-tailed deer are social as well as territorial animals.  A popular tool in the hunt for trophy whitetails has become the deer decoy.  Do they really work? The answer is yes on occasion but they may also create a problem situation.

Sitting in a treestand overlooking a flood plot with a buck decoy standing guard is a perfect scenario. That is until out of nowhere a rutty buck springs into action.  From out of the brush he charges the decoy.  His antlers lowered, he smashes into the foam decoy scattering pieces in an explosion.  The incident takes only minutes and the surprised deer is gone back into the concealment of the brush.

Arguably the decoy worked but not in the way the hunter planed. Planning in the placement of a decoy is still an effective tool.

Decoys that are a part of the environment and have a natural look to them certainly fool deer.  The more techniques one uses in placement and blending of a decoy the better the chance it will fool a deer.

Perhaps the best time to use a decoy is during the rut. During the rut, deer are very territorial.  Bucks constantly make and check their scrapes.  Near a scrape is a great place to place a decoy.  Be sure to place the decoy so that it is not looking at your stand.  Any deer approaching will look in the direction that the “stranger” decoy is looking.  You can use the decoy to divert the attention of the other deer away from a stand.  It is important for the hunter to pick camo that blends into the background, not the foreground.  The idea is to keep the deer focused on the decoy, not the hunter.

Placement of a decoy can maneuver the deer into a position for a shot.  One can use a blowdown or other structure to move the deer as he tries to get a good look at the decoy.

A bedded doe decoy is good for this type of action.  Bedded doe decoys have a calming effect on an approaching buck.

Another set up is to place a buck and doe decoy together on the edge of a corn stubble field or grass field.  By placing them at the edge of the field it is possible to pull in a deer that is entering an open area.  With the buck standing and the doe bedded it presents the appearance of a buck trying to get a doe to stand.  During the rut, bucks breed does as long as they will stand.  A dominant buck will attempt to run off the buck decoy so as to be able to take over the doe.

It is important that the decoy buck have a small rack so as not to intimidate any arriving buck.

Although decoying is basically a visual situation, scents and calls are sometimes used.  It is not essential to use scents or calls.  Some hunters just like to cover all the bases.  If using a scent the best one is from the tarsal gland or a mild buck scent.  It is important to wear rubber gloves when handling the decoy so as not to leave a human scent on the decoy.

Human scent is scary to a deer.  Some hunters leave their decoy out in the elements just to reduce the chance of human scent on it.

In using a call, again the best plan is to use it as little as possible so as not to scare off an approaching buck.  When a big buck comes to a call, it is expecting to see another deer.  If it does not, then he becomes suspicious.  The best plan is to use a doe bleat interspersed with a buck grunt.  If you get a response from another deer, quit calling immediately.  You don’t want to distract the deer from the decoy.

Decoying deer is another tool, not an end all, for the deer hunter.  With a little common sense the results it brings is a pleasant surprise.

FISHING WITH CANE POLES   Leave a comment

 

We often refer to the basics of fishing as a rod and reel and some terminal tackle. Yet there is nothing more “basic” than fishing with a cane pole.  To many it began a fishing career and a lifetime of fond memories.

Today’s fishing poles and rods come in a seemingly endless variety of lengths, materials and shapes. Yet, they all owe their beginnings to the cane pole.  Early anglers simply chopped down a bamboo or river cane stalk, tied a line to it containing a fishing hook baited with an insect or worm.

Back in the “stone age” when I was a youngster, my grandmother introduced me to the pleasures of fishing with a bamboo pole on a tailwater below the Mitchel Dam in northern Iowa. I was probably about 4 or 5 years of age.  We only caught one fish that day but it was a bass of about 6 or 7 pounds.  We did put it on the scale but I have forgotten just how much it weighed.

That summer I was allowed to fish with the bamboo pole at a creek on her farm and in the horse tank where she released some bullheads. It was a great summer.

Anglers can use a cane pole out of a boat, from shore, or from a dock. It works in rivers, streams, creeks, ponds and lakes.  Its limber nature allows one to notice the slightest jerk from a fish.

You can keep the short line tight with a couple of sinkers and when a fish nibbles, one just jerks straight up. Jerking quickly is best.  But, don’t try to rip their lips.

The angler with a cane pole has to contrive to catch fish within the limit of the poles’ reach. That reach is only the length of the pole and line, less the distance from the butt to the grip.  Without a float (bobber) this distance could be as much as 20 feet.  But, as the bait sinks, the distance gets less due to the bait swinging in a pendulum fashion back toward the angler.

Without a float, the angler can lower the pole until it is horizontal with the surface of the water. That will place the bait roughly 10-feet deep.

A cane pole requires an angler be stealthy when approaching fish due to the limit of their tackle. He must read shoreline water and know where to find fish.  The shoreline also tells them what kind of bottom to expect.  Different species of fish like different bottom structure.

Cane pole fishermen might look for short stretches of rocks and gravel. Or for largemouth he might pick the weedy shoreline in low places where black dirt and vegetation is visible and where areas off shore are over grown.  The vegetation might be lily pads, coontail, cattails and rushes.

Areas below bluffs would be perpendicular and go to a depth beyond reach. It is vital to find areas of modest depth reachable by this equipment.  It serves as home to forage fish upon which game fish can feed.

Use care to avoid spooking the fish in clear water situations.  Shallows containing lots of emergent vegetation or weed beds provide the angler some concealment and a better chance of getting closer to fish.

The kind of bait used or strength of line varies according to the angler’s preference and species he is seeking.

For some it is fun to return occasionally to cane pole fishing and meet the challenge it presents. Such anglers experience the peace and tranquility of a type of fishing many of us grew up experiencing.

 

PUBLIC LAND HUNTING PLANS   Leave a comment

Hunters should not look to public land hunting as a last resort. As someone who does not have access to private land and not the time to manage a private lease, there has been a need to resort to making productive use of public lands.  The average hunter ignores many acres of public land.

Public land located near home can be a savior of quality time spent afield. Maybe we could call them “stay hunts.”  Many of us are familiar with the “staycations” that have become popular due to the present economic situation.  With proper planning and care to details quality hunting opportunities are available.

Pre-season scouting is helpful. However, it is not always possible to get out to the hunting area ahead of time.  No matter where it is located all hunting areas are on a map.  It can be a topographical map, GPS map, highway map, county highway department map or even something published by local wildlife agencies.

Become familiar with the land regardless of species sought. Learn the location of natural structures that effect wildlife.  Find food plot locations and in general find areas game is likely to prefer.

Maps also aid one in locating the most remote portions of the property often overlooked by hunters. Game is not likely to stay near parking lots and roads.  Hunters quickly use those areas first.  Search out the dirty, thick cover where game hides during times of hunting pressure.  Cattail swamps, briars, weed fields and such are where most public land hunters will not readily enter.

It is common logic that would lead one to hunt public areas during the week. On the weekends and in the early days of any species specific season you find the heaviest hunting pressure.  Toward the very end of the season you may even have the entire area to yourself.

If you cannot hunt during the week, use the hunting pressure to your advantage. Movement of other hunters often drives game.  Figure where that game is most likely to move and set up your hunt accordingly.  It helps to be aware of any hunting that is likely to be going on in adjoining land.  Hunters there may drive game onto public land.

Know the exact boundaries of the public land to avoid trespassing fines. Trespassing can get expensive if the landowner is not understanding of your mistake.  Fines are high.  It is good to know the location of buildings and livestock areas.

Just because it is taxpayer land does not mean that you can do anything you want to it because your taxes paid for it. We all share the land.  In most cases it is first come first serve on a hunting spot.  It you are hunting an area and come across another hunter, do your best to avoid him or interfere with his hunting.

On the flip side, if you are hunting in an area and see another hunter approach, make sure he knows you are present. The best practice is to whistle or shout.  Once you have his attention, wave you hand to make him aware of your location.  If he is considerate, the other hunter will move off and make way for both of you to have your own areas.  Do not let rude behavior, yours or his, ruin your day.

Some hunters stay away from public land hunts and that is their right. But, just because it is public land does not mean that it is not a good place to hunt.  Common sense and courtesy go a long way toward you and other hunters enjoying a great day afield.

TEAL HUNTING REQUIRES PREPARATION   Leave a comment

 

Decoy spreads for teal with blues and green-winged decoys are set out in small groups of three to five.  Set them in a well-defined fly and kill zone with some 5 dozen of the groups spread out to maximum the kill zone.

An open area allows the teal to fly in and still does not intimidate them.  When the decoys are properly in place the teal will drop low and fast right onto the water.

A teal call emits a very high pitched, single reed sound like a mallard hen call.  Teal seem to work very quietly. Uses a few soft feeding chuckles and a few short hen quacks.  Then he let the call drop on the lanyard around your neck and prepare for shooting action.

The birds on the water rise straight up in a tight group and out of range at what seems the speed of light.  The report of a gun only seems to encourage their departure.

Early teal season does not attract a lot of hunters.  The birds are apparently very susceptible to cold weather causing them to migrate early.  They seem to prefer hot, muggy weather and mosquitoes over frost and ice.

Teal are dabbling ducks.  They frequent fresh water marshes and rivers and feed by dipping or tipping.  They will feed on the surface or only as far underwater as they can reach without submerging.  Their diet consists of vegetable matter.

Here their menu consists of water hemp, nut grass, millet, smart weed, insects and mollusks.

Although hunters may use a teal call, most hunters should leave their calls at home.  Decoys are all one needs in a way of attractant.  Teal, like other ducks, are social idiots.  They want to be with other ducks.

Most teal hunters use to much gun.  A 20‑gauge with a modified or improved cylinder works well.  The shot should be #6 steel as pattern density is more important than pellet size.  The average size of a picked teal is about the same as a bar of soap.  It does not take a lot of shocking power to down them.

In preparation for teal season, it is a good idea to go to a clay target range.  Ask them to throw some “midis” (90mm) and some “minis” (60mm) targets.  Learn to shoot fast, crossing targets.  They are the kind that if you think about the shot, they will be gone.

If you do not have a trap range make one using a hand thrower. The Super Sport Hand Thrower from Champion Traps & Targets in Wisconsin (www.championtargtet.com) is a very serviceable alternative to the more cumbersome mechanical machines.  They are inexpensive, portable and easy to use.  The adjustable hand thrower is adjustable to throw standard, midi and mini clay targets.

Preseason scouting is a good idea a few days before hunting.  Teal hunting hot spots are fairly predictable from year to year if the habitat does not change.

Teal hunting is fun and they are good on the table.  This year why not get out and give them a try?

A PRIMER FOR CRANKBAIT FISHING   Leave a comment

As we move into fall fishing the selection and use of a crankbait takes a little thought. Many find its use too complicated and limit their selection to just a few baits.

In the tackle stores one finds countless types and colors of this lure. The variations involve many colors and bills or varying sizes.

As far as what crankbait to run when the selection is dependent on the depth of the fish’s location in the water column. Bass might be in two feet or 22-feet of water.  If fish are shallow it calls for a lure that runs shallow.  If they are deep then one with a larger bill is required to the lure run deeper.

The shallow running crankbait is often preferable for fish that are not aggressive enough for a spinnerbait to be successful. The crankbait is good for these finicky fish.

Some people trim the bill of a crankbait to make it run shallower. Others just switch to one with a smaller bill.  The main requirement of crankbait fishing is that the bait runs straight.  It means that you are getting its maximum depth and best action.

There is one exception to this rule. One can detune a crankbait if fishing along a dock and you want the lure to run underneath it.  You can detune it to run to the side.  But for most situations you want the lure to run straight.

There is a physical toll on the angler when fishing with crankbaits. The deep diving crankbaits can wear one out.  In an effort to counter act this physical tool anglers will use a 7-foot cranking rod for deep diving baits and a 6-foot 6-inch one for the smaller baits as well as tight conditions.  A rod with a flexible tip also absorbs a lot of the pull during a retrieve.  With a really stiff rod that pulls is harder on the angler.

To polish crankbait fishing skills go to a lake that has good crankbait potential. Take everything out of the boat except the bait and equipment related to crankbait fishing.  It forces one to learn the techniques necessary if you do not have any alternative.  It forces you to figure out how to catch fish with a crankbait.

Crankbait fishing may not be the easiest pattern to learn. But, it is a great tool that is productive once you learn how to use it.

SUMMER ON THE OHIO RIVER   Leave a comment

The Ohio River has a long and varied history. It can be the mother of commerce or it might turn against civilization with floods beyond imaginations.  But to the angler it can lead to tributaries plump with a number of game species.

Nestled beneath a large bluff on the Ohio River, is the Golconda Marina, gateway to Smithland Pool.  The marina is the entrance to the some 23,000-acres of recreational water that is the river and its tributaries.

Unusually wet weather swells the normally placid looking main channel with high water.  It is not so much the volume of water that crimps the fishing in this region; it is the junk that washes downstream during the high water.  It can make navigation dangerous as huge cottonwoods floating down from areas to the northeast can damage a boat and snag fishing gear.

Smithland Pool refers to the section of the Ohio above the Smithland Lock and Dam at Hamletsburg.  The pool is more than 72 miles in length.  The shoreline, numerous islands and deep clean water attract thousands of anglers each year.  They prowl the shoreline in search of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, Kentucky spotted bass, crappie, bluegill, walleye, sauger, striped bass, white bass and catfish.

Located in the town of Golconda, the marina offers overnight moorage, covered slips, boat rental, gas, diesel, shower facilities, mechanic service, and food.

Down river, the Smithland Lock and Dam is an exciting fishery of striped bass and hybrid striped bass.  These battlers are very challenging in the current of the river.  Anglers target these fish with big surface poppers, plastic jerkbaits and jigging spoons.  The fishing is best as the river is on the rise as well as when the water levels run about 35 feet.  Good locations for those looking for these scrappers are the heads of islands early in the morning and late in the evening. When the locks are open the stripers seek out the fast flowing water that washes bait fish through the dam.

Largemouth bass inhabit the river.  Generally the better bass action is in the feeder creeks just off the main river channel.  The brushy areas and stump fields of Lusk Creek are the most popular area for bass anglers.  The mouth of the creek is just a short distance from the marina and convenient to enter.  One just exits the marina cove and enters the first creek to the south.

The best summer fishing times are from dawn to about 9:00 a.m. and two hours before dusk until the light is gone.

During summer months, bass require a little finesse in lure presentation.  Slow roll spinnerbaits in standing timber of the old channel.  Following any rain, the creek tends to muddy up.  Then it is time to get out the salt craws.  Black, electric blue and chartreuse are the best colors.  Again it is good to fish the wood, any wood, which is just off the main channel.

Best known as a catfish factory, the Ohio has huge numbers of channels and blues.  Anglers present natural baits such as cut shad on the bottom near current breaks.  The best time to go catfishing seems to be when the water is rising or is at a high water mark.  The action seems to be best in about 10 to 18 feet of water and near the wing dams on the river.

For the bluegill anglers, the streams agree the best bet.  Good quality fish will take baits such as worms, pieces of shrimp, or crawfish.  Work the baits around the submerged tree tops and brush.

Crappie anglers jig with long poles back into the wood.  They “dip minnows” near the wood seeking big fish resting in the shade.  The key is to jig near visible cover.  The creeks have plenty to choose from.

Although the best known fishing locations are downstream from the marina, there are numerous feeder creeks to the upstream side.  In all the 51 miles stretch between Smithland Lock and Dam and the Saline River, there are 10 major and 12 minor streams entering the river from the Illinois side.  An additional 8 major streams and 5 minor ones enter the river from the Kentucky side.

TRI STATE RV NEW TITLE SPONSOR OF SOUTHERN ILLINOIS HUNTING & FISHING DAYS   Leave a comment

Southern Illinois leading recreational vehicle dealer Tri State RV of Anna, IL has joined a southern Illinois tradition this year as Title Sponsor.

The event on the campus of John A. Logan College, Carterville, IL is celebrating its 30th anniversary September 23-24, 2017. The annual event teaches outdoor recreational skills, ethics and conservation issues associated with them.

Ken Frick, a veteran outdoorsman and CEO of Tri State RV, finds that his company and Southern Illinois Hunting & Fishing Days is a natural fit. His company works with hunters, fishers and campers over southern Illinois and Missouri as well as the greater St. Louis area and western Kentucky.  Established in 1994 they are the number 1 “Toy Hauler” in these areas.  The company is in the top 6 of RV dealers in Illinois.

“Hunting and fishing is good healthy fun,” exclaims Frick, “and so is camping.” He has spent many years hunting waterfowl and deer in southern Illinois as well as in guiding at a local waterfowl club.

A family based and operated business, Frick is proud to say they regard all of their 20 employees as part of the family. The Tri State family is looking forward to meeting and greeting the attendees at Southern Illinois Hunting & Fishing Days and showing them their many brands of recreational vehicles.  Frick asserts, “We look to continuing our sponsorship in the years to come.”

 

%d bloggers like this: