CRAPPIE FISHING TIPS   3 comments

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It is always difficult to find big crappie when moving into the post-spawn period. They are usually scattered all about the lake. Recently a conversation with TJ Stallings, the man in charge of Marketing and Crazy Ideas for TTI-Blakemore Fishing Group, shed some interesting light.

Stallings, a student of fish activity, explains post-spawn crappie break up into small clusters of fish and move around very actively. That is why they are difficult to pattern. The two commonalities of their behavior are that they relate to submerged structure and are easily spooked.

On a crappie-fishing excursion in Alabama, our discussion turned to some anecdotes that seemed confusing. Two anglers fishing side by side in the same boat have a completely different experience. A person on the left gets no bites while the person fishing on the right catches nice big fish one right after another. The anglers are sitting, and are fishing, just inches apart. The pair actually moves the boat to allow the non-catching angler to fish the same spot.

Both anglers use the same tackle and bait, a jig and minnow combination.

“Where is the sun,” asks Stallings. “A Crappie reacts to shadows and other factors over looked by most anglers.” He goes on to explain some of the factors and an education in “crappie catching” follows.

Our intrepid anglers had placed the front of the boat right over a stake bed but the sun was behind them. It cast a shadow over the area fished by one man but not the other. The area in the shadow did not produce fish.

Stallings goes on to explain the necessity of silent running when approaching a brush pile or stake bed. It is a common understanding among crappie anglers that one does not approach such areas with the big motor running. However, TJ also cuts his trolling motor and drifts into his fishing area. He always approaches with the sun in his face to avoid casting a shadow on the area he plans to fish. Stallings uses a “brush grabber” to hook on to any brush instead of an anchor. It is a metal clamp that looks like the ones used to jump start a vehicle except this one attaches to a rope. The rope attaches to one of the boat cleats and holds the boat in place. The clamp attaches to a stationary object like a tree, bush or other stick up.

He also goes to extremes to fish silently. “I turn off the pumps in the live well and bait well too,” explains TJ. He only leaves them off until the bigger fish begin to bite. “You can turn them back on then as it does not seem to be a distraction when they begin biting.”

Another part of his silent running is to not talk or move around in the boat until the fish begin to bite. “I don’t talk to my partner or to any of the other boats nearby.”

Moving around is important in post-spawn crappie fishing. Because the fish are scattered, it is a good idea to only fish for about 15 minutes in any non-productive area. It is a run and gun type of experience. If fish quit biting in a single location, move on. You can always come back to the area later and it may produce more action.

 

Before moving on be sure that you have probed the entire area as fish may be only a few inches away from your bait and not take it. Nevertheless, if you move it to a location they like better, the fish will take it.

Post-spawn crappies are finicky. However, it you are quiet and watch the shadows success can be yours.

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3 responses to “CRAPPIE FISHING TIPS

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  1. I know that guy! 🙂

  2. Pingback: CRAPPIE FISHING TIPS | AverageOutdoorsman

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