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TIPS FOR FISHING ICE OUT CRAPPIES   2 comments

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As spring brings warmer water temperatures to the Land of Lincoln, crappies begin to move from deep water haunts toward their traditional spawning habitat. As they stage in the more shallow water, anglers seek them out.

Two waters can present different fishing challenges while also containing a prominent crappie fishery. One is a long stretch of water with rocky bluffs and deep water close to shore.  The other is shorter and much wider with a kind of bowl structure with great shoreline vegetation.

The challenge of fishing for pre-spawn crappies is mostly finding them. This involves knowing their seasonal movements.  The spawn dominates the habits of fish in spring.  Water clarity is a factor in finding fish.  Turbid water following flooding and low light penetration limits vegetation growth to shallow water.  In very clear, undisturbed water the fish remain deep.  As predators they seek preferred forage.  Knowing where the forage is located goes a long way in finding crappies.

Fishing for pre-spawn crappies requires stealth, patience, ability to read the water and a sound knowledge of the species.

Crappies feed according to changes in weather and barometric pressure. They cause the fish to move tight to cover and become inactive.  Successful anglers look for warmer water seeking out colored water, a windward shoreline, a dark soft bottom, shallow water, tributary streams and heat absorbing cover such as wood.

Early on in the month crappies will be in shallower water on dark, warm days and deeper on clear ones. High water is common.  Fish will often move up into the temporarily flooded vegetation.  It is advisable to check a variety of depth zones and not overlook checking odd locations.

Cold water crappies are not usually aggressive feeders. Fish slowly.  They will not chase bait or lure very far.  It is best to keep a lure right on their nose.

Jigs are the bread and butter of crappie lures. A good assortment of leadhead jigs in 1/16th to 1/64th ounce, in crappie colors or white, black and yellow are basic, but not the end all.  Other colors produce action, as feeding habits of the crappie can be finicky.   Couple them with tube bodies of the same colors.  For the natural bait aficionado jigs with minnows and wax worms are the ticket.

There are three basic methods to catch crappie: vertical jigging, dabbling, and casting/retrieving jigs.

Vertical jigging involves parking over a known crappie location and dropping a jig straight down into it.

A related technique is dabbling. This requires a long pole to drop the jig into pockets and holes in heavy brush or flooded cover.  Using a short section of line, move the jig from one spot to another.  It is jigged a bit and then pulled up and moved to another location.

Casting jigs involves casting up a shoreline and then retrieving it with a slow swimming motion. Speeding up or slowing down the retrieve varies the depth at which the jig travels.  Once fish are located at a specific depth, the angler concentrates on that depth.

It is important to stay within five feet of the desired level, as crappies tend to concentrate feeding activity to one depth. You need to keep the jig right among the crappies.  Larger fish are usually in a layer just under the smaller ones.

Often in cold water the fish will suspend off of the bottom. Anglers can drop a jig to the bottom, then crank or lift it back up.  Since crappies feed up due to the placement of their eyes, they will tell you what level they prefer their forage.  You can then concentrate your fishing at that level.

As with all fishing, it is important to keep an open mind, use the right equipment, fish slowly and try to keep your lure where there are fish.

 

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