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SPOT AND STALK CRAPPIE HUNTING   3 comments

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One of the late winter rites of passage is ice out crappie fishing.

Locating the ice out crappie is a matter of going where they should be and going where they are.  The latter probably requires electronic fish locators.  The former is a matter of experience in that you go where they were during past springs.

A good topo map is helpful.  Dark bottoms on the north side of lakes are a good prospect in that they get early sun and hold warmth.

Of the tow crappie species, the white crappie prefers the large open water.  Both species will suspend in relation to lake points, sunken islands, sand bars, creek beds and debris found in most waterways.  Both can and do inhabit the same water.

Both crappie species have roughly the same spawning habits, laying eggs in water 3 to 8 feet in depth, once the water temperature approaches the mid-sixty degree range near cover.

White crappies tend to like brush piles, bushes or sunken logs.  The black crappies like reeds or other weeds.  There can be a great deal of pre-spawn angling in channels and bays due to early ice out and the water being too cold for spawning.

Deep creek beds are a key to cold water crappie locations.  Begin by searching likely summer holding areas and then back track to the nearest deep creek bed.  Then follow the channel to the best available holding area.  On a large lake this can be a considerable distance.  Some creek beds are more promising than others.  One with wood in or near the creek bed is best.

Lacking any wood either visible or hidden try bends or intersections.  Sharp bends or intersections with roads and secondary channels often produce fish.

Good bays should have no channels, or at least not adequate ones serve well.  If all else fails try the deep water and fish deep.

Jigs are the bread and butter lure for cold water crappie.  A good assortment of leadhead jigs in 1/16th to 1/64th ounce in colors of white, black or yellow is good basic tackle.  Couple them with tube bodies of the same colors.  For the natural baits minnows and waxworms are best.

It is important to remember that the fish are very spooky this time of year.  If scared, they will stop feeding.  The best bet is to locate fish and then make long casts to the school with a slip float rig.  Make short pauses in the retrieve or about 30 seconds each.

Crappie strikes come as the jig begins to settle to the bottom of the length of line below the float.  Small floats are more sensitive and show very light bites that often occur.

Fishing for crappie just after ice out requires stalking to find them as well as a lot of hunting to find schools.  It is however very productive and provides time to unlimber that old casting arm and get rid of Spring fever.

 

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