THE DECLINING DAYS OF WATERFOWL SEASON   1 comment

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For many ducks and other waterfowl of the Mississippi Flyway, western Tennessee is a wintering location. They may leave occasionally but always seem to return.  The duck migration is prominent but some geese are also present.

Late season includes teal (both blue and green-winged) ring-necks, shoveler, gadwall, widgeon, pintail, mallards and occasionally some Canada and speckled belly geese. Not all the species are there all the time.  They move out and maybe travel to warmer areas for a few days only to return.

Waterfowl hunting is a major wintertime activity around Reelfoot Lake and area ponds and small lakes. They provide field, open water and pot-hole hunting.  Area resorts and camps provide hunters with needs such as guide, blinds, and boat rentals.

Hunting continues until the end of January for all species. Special seasons for snow geese run until early March.

Born of the violent earthquakes of 1812-13, the lake and surrounding area consists of some thirty to fifty thousand square miles that underwent dramatic topographical changes visible today. During the quakes left sunken areas, fissures and land domes.  The reversal of the flow of the Mississippi River flooded much of the area creating the lake as well as flat fertile land for agricultural purposes.

As the migrating flocks arrive the birds feed heavily on protein rich grains. They rest at night on large water areas for protection from predators.  By day they move to the grain fields available in the area.  Once they have rebuilt sufficient stocks of protein they turn to the invertebrates found in more shallow water areas including pot holes and ponds.

The birds hold in big water during colder air temperatures as the big water stays open longer and is not prone to freeze over.

When hunting small areas of water near large areas, the late season birds pitch out of the air and decoy easily. By watching live ducks, and how they react to other live ducks, one finds they the flocks are composed of even numbers of birds.  This may mean that combined with their becoming so territorial, they have already paired up.  They do not want to endure any harassment from other members of the flock.

Using this information, you may want to change your use of decoys in the small water. Try scaling back the decoy spread and constantly change it each day.

Waterfowl tend to be a little more active before weather fronts. A change in barometric pressure occurs right before the front comes in.  Right after the front the pressure rises.

The birds become more active after a front passes because they can fly at higher altitudes. The hardest part of a duck’s exertion is the exhaling part.  In high pressure situations birds can fly higher and it is easier on them to make long distance flights.  The long distance flights make hunters want to pull their hair out.  The hunting in any one given spot becomes hard.

Late season waterfowl hunting and calling is a constant case of analyzing what is going on with the birds. You may never figure it out completely but you might get a little bit closer.

 

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One response to “THE DECLINING DAYS OF WATERFOWL SEASON

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  1. Hi Don, love your waterfowl blog. Give us a holler.

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