KASKASKIA RIVER KATS   3 comments

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Beginning with its headwaters in Champaign County, the Kaskaskia River flows some 280 miles to the southwest to join the Mississippi River.  The upper reaches of the river above Lake Shelbyville do not produce large catfish.  According to Trent Thomas, Region III Streams Biologist for the IDNR a survey in 2007 produced channel catfish up to 2.5 pounds and only a single flathead.

Today channel catfish in the 2 to 5 pound class are common throughout the river.  Some fish in the 10 to 15 pound class are available to anglers.

The area between Lake Shelbyville and Carlyle Lake produce channel catfish in larger numbers and are somewhat larger.  The larger channel catfish come from the tailwaters at Carlyle Lake and the deeper pool with cover along the length of the river.

Flatheads up to 60 pounds are in the oxbows.  Near Cowden fish near 40 pounds are reported.

The area below Carlyle Lake begins at the dam tailwaters, a popular angling hot spot.  This is the province of IDNR Stream Biologist Randy Sauer.  The 95 miles of river has a lot of 1-5 pound channel cats and some 25 pound flatheads.  The best flathead area seems to be in the rocky section near the Gen Dean suspension bridge.  Occasionally a large blue cat caught.

Blues are a big river fish.  They are most often in the river proper in sizes up to 25 pounds.  The deep navigation channel affords year round habitat but some spawners are found near shoreline rocks and brush in late spring and early summer.  Two good locations seem to be near Venedy Station and just above New Athens.

The deeper pools near root wads and brush hold cats during daytime.  They move to the rocky fast water stretches to feed at night.  Most are in the 5 to 25 pound size range but some of the older and much larger are caught each year.

The meandering channel between Carlyle Lake and Fayetteville does not receive a lot of pressure.  But there are usually some bank sets and hoop nets, especially near the many clubhouses along the shore.

This area is typical of many Illinois rivers in summer.  Boating can be a tricky experience.  The lower summer flows and the amount of structure in the water can be hazardous.  In-stream habitat of bank holes, brush piles and wads of roots provide great fishing for both channels and flatheads.  Sauer recommends anglers in summer probe the holes on the outside of bends.  They are usually 10 to 15 feet deep and the best fishing is on the upstream side of the hole.

According to Sauer, the 36-mile navigation channel below Fayetteville is the best fishery in the river.  “The steam flow is virtually non-existent,” says Randy.  He explains that not having to contend with current, the catfish devote more energy to body growth.  They feed on the abundance of shad and young sunfish.

While the central channel holds water in the nine foot depth range, there are a number of oxbows connected to the main river at their downstream ends.  The channel catfish like to feed along the shore of the main channel and the flatheads prefer the oxbows deeper holes.  The largest blue cats tend to hang in those oxbow holes as well.

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3 responses to “KASKASKIA RIVER KATS

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  1. A wonderful post! I like it!

  2. I fish around new athens always do the best on main channel got 4 blues over 40lbs last summer on cut Asian carp

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