OUTDOOR WRITER LEAVES MARK TWAIN COUNTRY   1 comment

DSCN4372

Sitting on the bank to slow moving Mississippi River the town of Hannibal, Missouri is a backdrop on the western bank.  It has been home for 4 days.  Leaving stirs mixed emotions.  Leaving with ideas and material for many future articles, new friends will become fodder for future writings.

Nestled in the gently rolling hills of northeastern Missouri, Hannibal’s durability in the face of the frequent flooding by the Mississippi River is a testament to the rugged spirit of its people.

A fall visit allows one to view all the sites, shop, and eat at the many restaurants while avoiding the tourist crowds of summer that plague other such sites in the state.

Casting out to the concrete pillars supporting Interstate 72, the sound of a dinner riverboat adds to the mystique of the community.  It will take visitors and locals on a sightseeing cruise while serving excellent dinner fare.  The overcast day blocks an otherwise beautiful view of the setting sun for these travelers.

High on the bluff across the river is a white lighthouse.  Visitors can view it and the scenery below if you can climb the stairs.  It is a breathtaking view of the town to the south and the river to the east.

Perhaps the most endearing aspect of visiting Hannibal is the people.  They live in a town where strangers greet one another as they pass on the sidewalk.  They are happy to encourage visitors to view the human habitat as well as the wild one beyond the city limits.

Sam Clemons moved here with his family at the age of 4.  He took a pen name of Mark Twain and left at age 17 to pursue a career as a riverboat pilot and to travel into history as one of Americas best known authors.  It is now time for this outdoor writer to reel in his line and head back home full of pleasant memories.

 

Advertisements

One response to “OUTDOOR WRITER LEAVES MARK TWAIN COUNTRY

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Pingback: OUTDOOR WRITER LEAVES MARK TWAIN COUNTRY | Don Gasaway's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: