DAY PACKS SAVE LIVES IN THE OUTDOORS   1 comment

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Over the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in day packs.  It’s a trend that has probably saved more than a few lives.  A day pack can vary from a fanny pack to a back pack.  The idea is that it contains all the things the hunter might have need of during the trip afield.

It use to be that hunters in the Midwest did not feel a need for a day pack.  We are after all quite close to civilization and can walk out of any risky situation.  WRONG!  How are you going to walk out if your leg is broken and your hunting partner is not within voice range?  Not long ago a mother, with her young child, went for a walk near their home in southern Illinois.  They became mixed up in the directions and night fell upon them.  The pair had to spend the night in the woods until rescue teams located them the following morning.  They were only a few miles from a large town but did not know which way to go.

What should a day pack contain?  First of all should be a first aid kit.  Good ones can be purchased or one can be constructed by the hunter.  It should contain everything from aspirin to band aids.  Burn ointment and bee-sting medicine is also a good idea.  If you have any particular medications that are taken on a regular basis, such as high blood pressure medication, that should also be included.  If the hunter does not see well without glasses, then a spare pair, in a hard case, is a good idea.   Moleskin is a good idea for treatment of blisters.

Next should be a space blanket, the type made of foil and light in weight.  A fire starting kit can be made of waterproofed stick matches and lint from the household dryer.  The lint can be packed in a zip-loc plastic bag.  Matches can be waterproofed by coating the heads with a heavy coating of clear nail polish.  This works better than coating with wax as the wax tends to melt in hot weather.  The nail polish coats the wood and match head to prevent penetration of moisture.

Also on the market is duct tape under the name of Duck Tape.  It comes in a three-yard flat pack that is easily stowed.  It is much easier to work with than taking a role of the usual grey duct tape.  Either type of tape is handy for repair of equipment or in emergencies.  It can be used to mend waders and to cover blisters.  It can be used to seal pan legs to keep out ticks or to tape an ice pack to a sprain.  You can even wrap ankles with the tape immediately after a sprain to provide stability and help reduce swelling.  It can be used to hold splints in place to support a broken bone.

A high shrill whistle is a good idea.  Whistles hold up longer than vocal cords when trying to attract help.  Three short blasts on a whistle is a recognized distress signal.  Another signal device is a mirror.  There are aluminum ones available in camping stores.  A good compass is a welcome navigational tool.   A map of the area can be helpful in case you become lost.

Another good tool is a multi-blade knife like the famous Swiss army knives.  A small flashlight and fresh batteries are a must.

It also helps to have some hard candy or a high energy bar as survival food and for peace of mind that you won’t starve to death.  Water purification pills and a large zip loc bag can be used to prepare water for drinking when your canteen becomes empty.

There are things like a wire saw or a saw-blade knife are handy for hunter in that they can use them to clear shooting lanes or to help in field dressing game that has been downed.

The purpose of the above survival items is to supply the necessities to provide for you positive sense of psychological as well as physical security.  It is there if you need it.

Other items in a day pack are more directly related to the type of hunting one is doing and the weather conditions one might encounter.  There is nothing like warm clothes to change into even if it is just dry socks after one has fallen into a stream.  A sweater is helpful if the weather situation is likely to change during the day.  Fall often means warm temperatures during the day with cold temps in the early and late portions.

Often a poncho or light weight rain suit is appropriate depending upon the type of hunting one does.  There are any number of thin plastic suits on the market that are very light in weight.  They do not have to be expensive if they are only to be used in emergency situations.  A large plastic garbage bag will even work.  Just cut holes of the head and arms and slip it over the top of your other hunting clothing.

Most day packs have several compartments.  The outside ones should be reserved for the first aid kit and for things like calls that might be needed on a minutes notice.  Bulky things like clothing can be packed inside the main compartment.  By packing and re-packing several times, the hunter is soon aware of the order he needs to use.  Try not to over load the pack.

You will find that the more you use the pack, the more sure you are of what to put in it and in what order.  Things like calls and trail gear as well as food stuffs (lunch and snacks) and water can get too heavy.  Take only what you think you will need.

 

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One response to “DAY PACKS SAVE LIVES IN THE OUTDOORS

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  1. Pingback: DAY PACKS SAVE LIVES IN THE OUTDOORS | Don Gasaway's Blog

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